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Camp NaNoWriMo is your online writers’ retreat, designed to help you set and reach your personal writing goals. Join us for your next writing adventure!

For those of you who have participated before, Camp NaNoWriMo looks a little different this year, as we’re hosting it on the new nanowrimo.org site. But the gist of it remains the same: set your own writing goals, join an online writing group, and give yourself a creative retreat this spring!

How can I participate in Camp NaNoWriMo?

  1. To participate in Camp NaNoWriMo, just announce a project, then make sure to check “Associate with a NaNoWriMo event”, and select the current Camp NaNoWriMo event.
  2. Once you’ve done that, you should be ready to start tracking your project! You’ll be able to start tracking your writing at 12:01 AM on April 1 in your time zone!
  3. Once you’ve reached your writing goal, the site will automatically confirm your win, and you’ll receive a certificate celebrating your achievement, along with a bunch of other winner goodies!

What’s happening at Camp?

🎬 Join our next Virtual Write-In TODAY Wednesday, April 1, 1 PM PST (Your Time Zone) for real-time writing prompts and sprints with the NaNo community from around the world.

💬 Join our #CampNaNoAdvice tweet chat on Friday, April 3, 1 PM PST (Your Time Zone)! Ask our Camp Counselors and published authors An Na, Dallas Woodburn, Devi S. Laskar, and Jennifer Ziegler your questions. They’ll also be delivering daily advice to your NaNoMessages here throughout April!

👋 Become part of a writing group! You can now join or create a 20-person writing group to post messages and chat with your fellow writers. (Looking for cabin mates? Find them on our forums!)

📚Check out our #StayHomeWriMo resources, prompts, and events to help you navigate writing, community, and self-care during social distancing.

#StayHomeWriMo: An initiative to support and encourage you to stay well and find comfort in creativity in these trying times.

Image description:

A yellow and teal graphic titled “#StayHomeWriMo: Day 2 Self-Care Checklist”

1. Mental Well-Being: Treat yourself to some reading time! Use your library’s e-book list, or if you can, buy it from bookshop.org.

2. Creative Well-Being: Writing prompt: Interview one of your own characters about what their social distancing experience would look like. 

3. Social Well-Being: Offer to video chat with a toddler or child. Sing songs, play a game, let them give you a tour of their toys.

4. Physical Well-Being: Set a bedtime for yourself tonight. Give your body the gift of a little structure for a day.

#StayHomeWriMo: An initiative to support and encourage you to stay well and find comfort in creativity in these trying times.

Image description:

A yellow and teal graphic titled “#StayHomeWriMo: Day 2 Self-Care Checklist”

1. Mental Well-Being: Spend half an hour learning a different language. Try an online platform like Duolingo!

2. Creative Well-Being: Sign up for Camp NaNoWriMo at nanowrimo.org! Set your own goal to whatever feels doable to you in April.

3. Social Well-Being: Check in on someone you know who’s isolated alone, and see if you can help in any way.

4. Physical Well-Being: Spa day! Take a long hot shower or bath. Do a face mask. Aaaah.

#StayHomeWriMo: An initiative to support and encourage you to stay well and find comfort in creativity in these trying times.

Image description:

A yellow and teal graphic titled “#StayHomeWriMo: Day 2 Self-Care Checklist”

1. Mental Well-Being: Get some fresh air! Open a window or go on a solo walk around a quiet neighborhood. 

2. Creative Well-Being: Go outside (if you safely can). Put on your writer hat (or mittens). Try to notice 5 things to write about!

3. Social Well-Being: Join our #StayHomeWriMo Happy Hour!

4. Physical Well-Being: Choose one of your favorite songs, turn it up, and have a three-minute dance party!

#StayHomeWriMo: An initiative to support and encourage you to stay well and find comfort in creativity in these trying times.

Image description:

A yellow and teal graphic titled “#StayHomeWriMo: Day 2 Self-Care Checklist”

1. Mental Well-Being: Make two quick lists: things you’re grateful for now, and things you’ll be grateful to get back to in the future.

2. Creative Well-Being: Writing Prompt: Write about a secret you or a character have been keeping.

3. Social Well-Being: Get together with some friends for a virtual movie night! (You can use an app like Netflix Party.)

4. Physical Well-Being: Try an online exercise or stretching class, any level.

#StayHomeWriMo: An initiative to support and encourage you to stay well and find comfort in creativity in these trying times.

Image description:

A yellow and teal graphic titled “#StayHomeWriMo: Day 3 Self-Care Checklist”

1. Mental Well-Being: Take a few minutes to read a poem, whether an old favorite or a new one.

2. Creative Well-Being: Writing exercise: Set your text to white and try writing in invisible mode. No inner editors allowed!

3. Social Well-Being: Join our Virtual Write-In. Invite a friend to join, too!

4. Physical Well-Being: Memorize a 20-second passage from your favorite book to recite whenever you wash your hands.

#StayHomeWriMo: An initiative to support and encourage you to stay well and find comfort in creativity in these trying times.

Image description:

A yellow and teal graphic titled “#StayHomeWriMo: Day 2 Self-Care Checklist”

1. Mental Well-Being: Set a 10 minute timer to stretch, meditate, or just breathe deeply. 

2. Creative Well-Being: Writing exercise: pick 5 words at random from different blog posts, tweets, or articles and use them all in a scene. 

3. Social Well-Being: Start a group chat just for sharing funny gifs.

4. Physical Well-Being: If you can, try out a new recipe! If you’ve got older kids, get them to help too. 

Last week, we sent out a survey asking how we could help make the coming weeks easier, more fun, and less stressful for you. Literally thousands of people responded and asked us to provide extra resources, activities, and opportunities for online connection.

That’s why we’re launching #StayHomeWriMo—an initiative to support and encourage you to stay well and find comfort in creativity in these trying times. Sure, the whole world might be keeping its physical distance from each other (please do), but that doesn’t mean we have to distance ourselves from our creative lives (please don’t).

NaNoWriMo’s staff has been working remotely over Slack, video conferencing, email, and G-chat to bring you a bevy of creative activities and self-care check-ins. #StayHomeWriMo is flexible so you can adapt it to fit your social distancing, schedule, and overall well-being, whether that’s writing fiction, journaling about this time in your life, being mindful of your emotional and physical health, or just making social connections at a safe distance. Each (week)day for the rest of March, we’ll post a checklist of prompts to help your mental, physical, social, and creative well-being.

  • Want to jump in early on a full creative project? You can start a project on the NaNoWriMo site now and customize the dates to your needs. 
  • Home with school-aged kids and need help keeping them busy? Sign them up on ywp.nanowrimo.org for age-specific resources and a youth-friendly writing space! 
  • Juggling pre-school aged kids and work and have zero down time for writing? Lean in on the mental, physical, and social check-ins and connect with other like-minded writers with no time to write in the comments of our social media, on our forums, and in your own spaces.

Get more details on #StayHomeWriMo on our website at https://nanowrimo.org/stayhomewrimo and please share this with your friends and loved ones who might be looking for new ways to connect and stay well.

Image description:

A yellow and teal graphic titled “#StayHomeWriMo: Day 1 Self-Care Checklist”

1. Mental Well-Being: Put your phone in a drawer for half an hour and give yourself a break from the news and social media

2. Creative Well-Being: Writing prompt: Write about a character who’s stuck inside. How do they feel about it? Why are they there?

3. Social Well-Being: Write and mail a letter to a friend or family member.

4. Physical Well-Being: Take note of where the tensest points in your body are. Take three deep breaths while relaxing those muscles!

Many of you may be facing extended isolation or time at home in the coming weeks. Maybe writing through hard times is a source of comfort to you and you’re looking forward to escaping into the world of your imagination. Maybe you can’t imagine wanting to write at all right now. We’re here to support you no matter which one of those camps you fall into.

We’d like to ask what we can do to support you as we get ready to host Camp NaNoWriMo in April. One of the best things about NaNoWriMo — and especially Camp — is that it’s an incredible source of virtual companionship and company at a time when you may feel increasingly lonely. We’ll be doing everything we can to increase those opportunities for social distancing-friendly connection and support.

If you have a moment, please fill out our survey to let us know what you would find most helpful and useful in the coming weeks as we all get through this together.

Meanwhile, we’re still offering all of our usual resources, activities, and community platforms. Here’s a list of some you might want to check out:

Stay healthy and safe, everyone. 

<3 The NaNoWriMo Staff

There’ve been lots of song suggestions going around to make sure that you wash your hands for at least twenty seconds, but — as we’re more the bookish types over here — we made a few with a literary spin (inspired by the Wash Your Lyrics generator). Stay safe and healthy by practicing some dramatic readings while you wash your hands, or suggest your favorite 20-second literary readings.

Image description: 

An infographic labeled “Hand-washing technique with soap and water”, with 13 panels depicting how to thoroughly wash your hands.  

Image #1 includes text beneath the panels from William Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet:

“O Romeo, Romeo! wherefore art thou Romeo?
Deny thy father and refuse thy name;
Or, if thou wilt not, be but sworn my love,
And I’ll no longer be a Capulet. […]
‘Tis but thy name that is my enemy:
Thou art thyself, though not a Montague.
What’s Montague? It is nor hand, nor foot,
[…] nor any other part
Belonging to a man. O, be some other name.
What’s in a name? That which we call a rose
By any other name would smell as sweet.”

Image #2 includes text beneath the panels from Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen.

“It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife.

However little known the feelings or views of such a man may be on his first entering a neighbourhood, this truth is so well fixed in the minds of the surrounding families, that he is considered the rightful property of some one or other of their daughters.

‘My dear Mr. Bennet,’ said his lady to him one day, ‘have you heard that Netherfield Park is let at last?’”

Image #3 includes text beneath the panels from The Jabberwocky by Lewis Carroll.

“’Twas brillig, and the slithy toves
     Did gyre and gimble in the wabe:
All mimsy were the borogoves,
     And the mome raths outgrabe.

‘Beware the Jabberwock, my son!
     The jaws that bite, the claws that catch!
Beware the Jubjub bird, and shun
     The frumious Bandersnatch!’

He took his vorpal sword in hand;
     Long time the manxome foe he sought—
So rested he by the Tumtum tree
     And stood awhile in thought.

[…] One, two! One, two!”

Text at the bottom of each image reads: “Adapted from National Health Service, who adapted from the World Health Organization Guidelines on Hand Hygiene in Healthcare. Created under the open government license. See http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/doc/open-government-lisence/version/3/ for details.”